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National Journal of Maxillofacial Surgery
 
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 152-155

Knowledge, attitude and practice regarding risk of HIV infection through accidental needlestick injuries among dental students of Raichur, India


Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, AME's Dental College Hospital and Research Centre, Raichur, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Yadavalli Guruprasad
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, AME's Dental College Hospital and Research Centre, Raichur - 584103, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0975-5950.94470

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Background: Injuries from occupational accidents are associ­ated with agents of biological risk, as they are the gateway to serious and potentially lethal infectious diseases that can be spread by contact between people. Several studies have demonstrated that dental students are among the most vulnerable to blood-borne exposure. Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice regarding risk of HIV transmission through accidental needlestick injury amongst dental students and providing supportive and proper guidelines regarding needlestick injuries and HIV infection. Study design: This was a cross-sectional study done at a dental college attached to a tertiary care hospital, which included third, fourth year students and interns. The results obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using Chi-square test. Results: Of the 120 students, 13 (11%) were not even aware that virus could be transmitted through infected needle. A significant proportion of the third year students i.e. 27 (67.5%) were not aware of correct method of disposal of disposable needles and syringes as against interns 17 (42.5%). Around 31 (26%) said that they would promote active bleeding at the site of injury and 37 (30%) said they would take post-exposure prophylaxis. Conclusion: Dental professionals are at a risk of occupational acquisition of HIV primarily due to accidental exposure to infected blood and body fluids. There is a need of correcting the existing misconceptions through education programs early in the course and providing supportive and proper guidelines regarding needlestick injuries and HIV infection.


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